Midnight Sun Camera Obscura Festival

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Published on : 2015-06-17 01:00:00


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The Klondike Institute of Art & Culture presents

Midnight Sun Camera Obscura Festival, Dawson City, Yukon, June 17-21, 2015

Dianne Bos (Canada/France), Lea Bucknell (Canada), Bob Jickling (Canada), Ernie Kroeger (Canada), Donald Lawrence (Canada), Doug Smarch (Canada), Holly Ward and Kevin Schmidt AKA Desire Machine (Canada/Germany), Carsten Wirth (Germany), Andrew Wright (Canada), Mike Yuhasz (Canada). With talks, research contributions and writing from Sven Dupré (Germany), Petran Kockelkoren (Holland) and Lance Blomgren (Canada).


During the solstice week, Dawson City will host three projects that look to optical history—the legacy of camera obscuras—as means of interrogating and celebrating the overlapping domains of art, science, and popular entertainment.

The four-day Camera Obscura Festival features 10 artists who have constructed site-specific, temporary camera obscuras that are publically accessible in different areas of town. Ranging from small portable devices to larger walk-in structures, these darkened spaces will capture Dawson’s longest days in ways that range from the spooky to the sublime.

In conjunction with the festival, KIAC’s ODD Gallery will feature The World Inside, a group exhibition with artists Dianne Bos, Lea Bucknell, Bob Jickling, Ernie Kroeger, Donald Lawrence, Holly Ward and Kevin Schmidt AKA Desire Machine, Andrew Wright and Mike Yuhasz. As a counterpoint to the Midnight Sun Camera Obscura festival, this exhibition investigates the intertwined subjects of landscape and viewership, perceptual mediation and the urgencies of our material condition. The World Inside illuminates the ways in which our visual technologies, including the eye itself, have worked to define and undermine our impressions of the real, our sense of self and community. The images and objects in this exhibition draw connections between what we see, how we see, and the enduring cultural effects of our empires of sight. Exhibition runs until July 25.

The Yukon School of Visual Arts Confluence Gallery features ... strange things done ... a group exhibition with students and alumni of Nova Scotia College of Art and Design University (NSCAD, Halifax), Thompson Rivers University (TRU, Kamloops), or the Yukon School of Visual Arts (YSOVA, Dawson City). Threading its way through the works in this exhibition is an interest in the manner in which early or low-tech forms of imaging, illusion and other communications technologies may be merged with new technology or with what is now the mundane or obsolete technology of modern times. Most of the artists have created works that are self-illuminated; the camera obscura’s optical properties just a starting point for their thinking. With work by Dion Fortie, Ryland Fortie, Megan Gamble, Levi Glass, Eliza Houg, Devon Lindsay and Bo Yeung.


SCHEDULE

Wednesday, June 17
…strange things done…” opening: 6-7pm @ SOVA
Festival Opening Remarks: 7:30pm @ KIAC Ballroom
Keynote Speaker: Sven Dupré: 7:45pm @ KIAC Ballroom

Thursday, June 18
Workshop with Donald Lawrence: 3-6pm (drop-ins welcomed) @ Shipwrecks
Artists Talks: Doug Smarch, Lea Bucknell, & Confluence Exhibiting Artists: 7pm @ KIAC Ballroom
The World Inside: Opening reception, ODD Gallery, 8:30pm
Town Site Installations Open 10am - 7pm
Project Tours: Mike Yuhasz: 11am - 5pm: Leaving the Odd Gallery every 1/2 hour

Friday, June 19
Tent Talk with Dianne Bos: 3:30-6:30pm @ Dawson Museum Project Site
Panel Discussion: Petran Kockelkoren & Artists: 7:30pm @ KIAC Ballroom
Town Site Installations Open 10am - 7pm
Project Tours: Mike Yuhasz: 11am - 5pm: Leaving the Odd Gallery every 1/2 hour

Saturday, June 20
Site Tours with Petran Kockelkoren: 11am & 3pm
Project Tours: Mike Yuhasz: 11am - 5pm: Leaving the Odd Gallery every 1/2 hour
Town Site Installations Open 10am - 7pm

Sunday, June 21
Breakfast Event: 11am-1pm @ Macaulay House Residency (7th & Princess)
Workshop: Bob Jickling: 1pm @ KIAC (meeting point) & Off-site Walking Tour
Town Site Installations Open 10am - 7pm
Project Tours: Mike Yuhasz: 11am - 5pm: Leaving the Odd Gallery every 1/2 hour

–––––––––––––––––––––––––

Based at Thompson Rivers University in Kamloops, B.C., The Camera Obscura Project and this Festival have received funding through an Insight grant from The Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada and from the Canada Council for the Arts. Please visit the group’s website midnightsuncameraobscura.com or www.kiac.ca/oddgallery/projects/cameraobscuraproject/ for updated information as the Festival draws near and to learn about group members’ practices.

The Midnight Sun Camera Obscura Festival has received generous support from the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada, The Canada Council for the Arts, Thompson Rivers University, The Klondike Institute of Art and Culture, the Yukon School of Visual Arts and the Yukon Arts Centre.

Please contact: Donald Lawrence
Participating artist/researcher, Principal Investigator of The Camera Obscura Project
Visual Arts, Thompson Rivers University, Kamloops, BC, V2C 2S9
dlawrence@tru.ca  |  250-574-0223


Klondike Institute of Art & Culture
Box 8000, Dawson City, Yukon, Y0B 1G0
(867) 993 5005
gallery@kiac.ca
www.kiac.ca


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In the Attic: Evan Jerry and Yshia Wallace - You Live In Me

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Published on : 2015-06-17 01:00:00


YOU LIVE IN ME
In the Attic: Evan Jerry and Yshia Wallace

June 17 – 21, 2015
Opening Reception: Thursday, June 18 from 5-8pm

Gallery 50
50 Gladstone Ave, Toronto, ON M6J 3K6, Canada

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You Live in Me is the first exhibition by In the Attic, a collaboration between emerging designer, Evan Jerry, and emerging artist, Yshia Wallace.

This work is the culmination of inward journeys undertaken by both artists in their respective searches for the ghost of childhood. Children lose their innocence. The shocks of existence are revealed to us in stages, and at each stage we must pay a toll. This coming of age continues through adulthood and into old age, but the transitions of childhood seem to haunt us most deeply. Wallace’s gouache paintings are portals into the ghost child’s world, while Jerry’s sculptural piece, Beast, is a reconciliation with something lost.



ABOUT IN THE ATTIC PROJECT
Yshia Wallace and Evan Jerry conceived of In the Attic in 2014 as a ground for cross-pollination between their respective disciplines of visual art and design. In the past year it has become an avenue for Wallace and Jerry to explore an imagined psychological space, the attic, where they can feel around in the darkness for whatever treasures and monsters lie hidden. The desire to share personal narratives, histories, identities and traumas is a reaction to feelings of fear, shame and detachment that Wallace and Jerry have experienced internally and in their environments. Through these acts of vulnerability the two hope to build connection and engagement.

Yshia Wallace is a Toronto based artist. Through her practice that includes painting and sculpture Yshia Wallace explores the ways uncertainty shapes the behaviour of individuals and the human species. She has a BA in English Literature from McGill University, has participated in an artist residency at The Banff Centre, and has exhibited in Toronto and Montreal.

Evan Jerry is a Toronto based artist and designer who uses space and objects to preserve the experiences, memories and cultural influences that shape identity. Evan has completed his BA at Ryerson University’s School of Interior Design, has studied at Aalto University in Finland and apprenticed as an artist for exhibits in Helsinki, Stockholm and Berlin.


Gallery 50
50 Gladstone Ave, Toronto, ON M6J 3K6, Canada
www.gallery50.ca


For more information:

Yshia Wallace
yshia@yshiawallace.com
www.yshiawallace.com
instagram.com/yshiawallace

Evan Jerry
evan@evanjerry.com
www.evanjerry.com
instagram.com/evan_jerry

facebook.com/intheatticproject

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Midnight Sun Camera Obscura Festival

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Published on : 2015-06-17 01:00:00


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Midnight Sun Camera Obscura Festival, Dawson City, Yukon, June 17-21, 2015

Summer Solstice 2015 will see a festival of cameras obscura and other like-minded artworks in Dawson City, Yukon — home of the twenty-four hour “midnight sun.”

Migrating across the domains of art, science, and popular entertainment the camera obscura held a prominent place in the visual culture of previous centuries. Ranging from small portable devices to permanent walk-in structures, these are darkened spaces in which live images of the outside world appear through seemingly magical means. With origins in Chinese, Greek and Islamic cultures, cameras obscura gained central importance in the optical culture of early modern Europe. Today these optical devices hold a continued fascination for artists and scholars - whether for the pleasure of their curious and inherently simple projected images or as a point of departure for a range of critical, historical and theoretical interests.

During the Midnight Sun Camera Obscura Festival artists’ projects in and around Dawson City will be complemented by exhibition projects in Canada’s northernmost contemporary art gallery, the ODD Gallery and at the Yukon School of Visual Arts' YSOVA Gallery in Dawson City. Hosted by the Klondike Institute of Art and Culture, festival events will include tours of the artists’ projects, workshops, and public presentations. The Festival is an event of the Camera Obscura Project, made up of an international group of artists, scholars and students who collectively explore interest in cameras obscura, related optical phenomenon, the connections between art and science, art-making in Northern and wilderness settings; and the meeting place of learning and play.

Artists and scholars participating in the Festival include: Dianne Bos (Canada/France), Lea Bucknell (Canada), Sven Dupré (Germany), Bob Jickling (Canada), Petran Kockelkoren (Holland), Ernie Kroeger (Canada), Donald Lawrence (Canada), Kevin Schmidt (Canada/Germany), Doug Smarch (Canada), Holly Ward (Canada/Germany), Carsten Wirth (Germany), Andrew Wright (Canada), Mike Yuhasz (Canada). The Festival will also involve visual arts students and alumni from Thompson Rivers University, the Yukon School of Visual Arts and the Nova Scotia College of Art and Design University.

Based at Thompson Rivers University in Kamloops, B.C., The Camera Obscura Project and this Festival have received funding through an Insight grant from The Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada and from the Canada Council for the Arts. Please visit the group’s website midnightsuncameraobscura.com for updated information as the Festival draws near and to learn about group members’ practices.

The Midnight Sun Camera Obscura Festival has received generous support from the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada, The Canada Council for the Arts, Thompson Rivers University, The Klondike Institute of Art and Culture, the Yukon School of Visual Arts and the Yukon Arts Centre.

Please contact: Donald Lawrence
Participating artist/researcher, Principal Investigator of The Camera Obscura Project
Visual Arts, Thompson Rivers University, Kamloops, BC, V2C 2S9
dlawrence@tru.ca  |  250-574-0223

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Gary Kibbins & Corinna Schnitt: A Good Idea Will Turn into a Bad One

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Published on : 2015-06-16 01:00:00



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A Good Idea Will Turn into a Bad One

An exhibition featuring videos by Gary Kibbins and Corinna Schnitt
Presented by Trinity Square Video; Curated by Ivana Dizdar

A Good Idea Will Turn into a Bad One considers systemic changes and value shifts, and takes up the question: how does something good become something bad?

Closing reception on Saturday, June 20 at 7:00 PM
Exhibition runs Tuesday, June 16 until Saturday, June 20


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Trinity Square Video
401 Richmond Street West, Suite 376
http://www.trinitysquarevideo.com/
info@trinitysquarevideo.com
416-593-1332

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IILA - Photography Prize, 8th Edition

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Published on : 2015-06-15 14:53:32
For photographers from Latin America not older than 40 years. Organized by the Instituto Italo-Latino Americano and VISIVA. Theme: The Present. Deadline: 10 July 2015.

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Politics and Practices of Secrecy (part 2)

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Published on : 2015-06-15 09:44:12

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Liberty Crossing is a complex for 1,700 federal workers and 1,200 contractors. Photo by Michael S. Williamson / The Washington Post

Previously: Politics and Practices of Secrecy (part 1).

And this is part 2 of the notes i took during the Politics and Practices of Secrecy symposium which took place at King's College in London last month. My reports do not follow the schedule of the panels, nor do they cover all the talks. I'm just cherry picking the more interesting moments of the day. Part 1 focused on the art projects. This post is less uniform in its theme. Two of the presentations i enjoyed covered the representation of intelligence agencies in films and tv fiction. Another was about the influence that new forms of surveillance are having on the rise of home-grown ('home' being the U.S.A., the symposium was organised by the Institute of North American Studies) white extremist groups. And a fourth talk wondered if transparency could fix our democracy.

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The Top Secret Network of Government and its Contractors

Let's start with Timothy Melley, Professor Affiliate of American Studies at Miami University and author of The Covert Sphere. Secrecy, Fiction, and the National Security State and of Empire of Conspiracy. The Culture of Paranoia in Postwar America.

In his talk, 'The Democratic Security State: Operating Between Secrecy and Publicity', Melley listed up a few numbers:

This secret world costs 8 billion dollars per year.

According to 2010 Washington Post analysis:

50,000 intelligence reports are written each year. Their volume is so large that most are never read.

The intelligence hides out in the open:
In Washington D.C., 33 building complexes for top-secret intelligence work have been built (or are being built) since September 2001. Their total surface is equal to 22 U.S. Capitols.
Similar buildings can be found in 10,000 other locations across the U.S.A.

The complexity of this system defies description Lt Gen. (Ret.) John R. Vines

The U.S. covert state is a growing industry. It handles a huge number of secrets all over the country. It relies on democratic structures but acts like a shadow state that has its own territory and laws. It also support some film makers by lending helicopters needed for films that publicize the covert world. The reason for that is that the secret programme needs public approval.

What we know about the CIA comes from leaks but also from fiction. Our screens are awash with what Melley calls 'terror melodrama." One of his presentations slides even listed those films. Covert CIA operations are celebrated in books, films, games, tv series, etc. Earlier this year, the CIA, pleased with the way it is portrayed in "Homeland", invited the show's cast and producers to visit its headquarters in Virginia and have a discussion. Another example is when Michelle Obama presented the 2013 Best Picture award to Ben Affleck's Argo, a film adapted from CIA operative Tony Mendez's book The Master of Disguise and the 2007 Wired article The Great Escape: How the CIA Used a Fake Sci-Fi Flick to Rescue Americans from Tehran.

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An exit marker points to the National Security Agency. Photo by Michael S. Williamson / The Washington Post

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The N.S.A. properties in Maryland total 8.6 million square feet of office space, 1.3 times as big as the Pentagon. Photo by Sandra McConnell, N.S.A.

Keeping with the spy in entertainment theme, Matt Potolsky, Professor of English at University of Utah, looked at the representation of the NSA on tv and in cinema.

Fiction and films are often the only way the public can picture and judge for themselves the activities of intelligence agencies. FBI, KGB, CIA have often been presented in films. How about the NSA? According to Potolsky, the NSA never turned into real fictional tropes.

The 2009 movie Echelon Conspiracy features NSA agents and the signals intelligence collection system Echelon.

There have been more recent attempts to depict the activity of the massive NSA:
- Citizenfour by Laura Poitras, of course.
- but also "Let Go, Let Gov" a South Park episode that satirizes the 2013 mass surveillance revelations, and casts Eric Cartman in the role of a whistleblower, in which he infiltrates the NSA in protest of the agency's surveillance of American citizens. In the episode, NSA agents appear as little more than anonymous cogs working behind desks. This obviously is very different from the 'Men in Black' style description of CIA agents. The NSA agents look like they are working for a multinational corporation rather than for a spy agency.


South Park, Let Go Let Gov

Mark Fenster, Professor at the Levin College of Law (University of Florida) and author of the book Conspiracy Theories: Secrecy and Power in American Culture. His talk was titled 'Secrecy and the Hypothetical State Archive.'

Fenster started by reminding us of a whistleblower of the early 1970s. Daniel Ellsberg was employed by the RAND Corporation when he not only read classified documents he wasn't supposed to open but also photocopied and released them to The New York Times and other newspapers. The Pentagon Papers, officially titled United States - Vietnam Relations, 1945-1967: A Study Prepared by the Department of Defense, were top-secret documents that charted the US' political-military involvement in Vietnam from 1945 to 1967.

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In June 1971 the New York Times began publishing the Pentagon Papers (image)

There is now a trust in 'transparency' but, Fenster asks, Can transparency fix our democracy? Obama was elected to end Bush's secrecy. But the secrecy is now as deep as ever. If not deeper.

But Fenster says, information leaks. Sometimes from the top, sometimes from the bottom. Sometimes drop by drop, sometimes it flows.

It is particularly tricky to control State information. If you think about the model of communication Sender-Message-Receiver, the Sender would be the State, the Message is state information and the Receiver is the public.

The state is organizationally complex, it is spatially deployed, it is enclosed in buildings, offices. In truth, it is a mess that is difficult to keep shut.

State information is difficult to perceive clearly, it is a vast amount of information, it is hard to archive and to control its release. Sometimes state information can leak by mistake.

The public is made of individuals and they will have their own interpretation of any information released.

In brief, information cannot be controlled, on any level.

According to Fenster, the revelation of a secret often offers marginal gains. It certainly doesn't lead necessarily to a reformed democracy.

Another talk i found very informative was the one by Hugh Urban, professor of religious studies at Ohio State University and author of The Church of Scientology: A History of a New Religion

His talk, 'The Silent Brotherhood: Secrecy, Violence, and Surveillance from the Brüder Schweigen to the War on Terror' looked at the white males' belief that they are the victims of racial oppression. In their view, white males are persecuted by women, Black people, Muslims, Jews, etc. That's what Urban calls the "white man falling" syndrome.

0abrotherhbslarge.jpgBrüder Schweigen or Silent Brotherhood, was a white nationalist revolutionary organization active in the United States between September 1983 and December 1984. Its founder Robert Jay Mathews wanted to create an elite vanguard of Aryan warriors to save the white race. The Silent Brotherhood group was responsible for a number of violent crimes: robberies, bombings, murders, counterfeiting operations, etc.

Nowadays, much of the anti-terrorist attention focuses on radical Islam, neglecting home-grown white extremist groups. Figures show that the number of patriot groups in the U.S. is growing very rapidly. The reasons for that are many: bad economic conditions, black president but also the rise of surveillance which augments these people's distrust of the FBI, NSA and other governmental agents.

Urban's conclusions were that:

1. Secrecy is both the explanation and the radical solution for the 'white man falling' syndrome.

2. New forms of surveillance play into, feed and reinforce the narratives of such radical groups.

Politics and Practices of Secrecy was organized by the Institute of North American Studies at King's College London, on 14-15 May, 2015.

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Sameer Farooq & Mirjam Linschooten | Always Already

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Published on : 2015-06-14 01:00:00


Sameer Farooq & Mirjam Linschooten: The Figure in the Carpet
&
Always Already

Summer Exhibitions at the Blackwood Gallery
Opening Reception: Sunday June 14, 1 – 3PM
A FREE shuttle bus will depart from Mercer Union (1286 Bloor Street W) at 12:30pm and return for 3:30pm. Artists will be present.


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The Figure in the Carpet
Sameer Farooq & Mirjam Linschooten
June 14 – August 2, 2015
Curated by Christine Shaw

The sorrow is in the curtains, the distress is in the vitrine, the pain is in the carpet and on the labels and the shelves, the authority is on the walls. For their exhibition at Blackwood Gallery, Sameer Farooq and Mirjam Linschooten take the ethnographic museum as a subject, exaggerating its repeated forms and revealing the “blueprints of distress” of its makers (to borrow from anthropologist Laura Anne Stoler). In Farooq and Linschooten’s treatment of museum display as an aesthetic medium, a complex space of social codes, ideological agendas, and haphazard protocols emerge from the glass. Proposing alternative models of display, this site-specific installation reflects on the ways by which cultural artifacts can be transformed into public knowledge, all the while recognizing that the fingerprints of the institution will always be on the material.

For more information on the exhibition, click here.



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Always Already
Alison Kobayashi, Ryan Park, Roula Partheniou, Jon Sasaki and Josh Thorpe
June 14 – August 2, 2015
Curated by Julia Abraham

Always Already presents the Blackwood Gallery’s ten recent acquisitions of work by Alison Kobayashi, Ryan Park, Roula Partheniou, Jon Sasaki and Josh Thorpe. Always Already highlights the character of this new collection as one that functions in a continuum of potential prospects and imminent iterations. Each of the artists has been included in previous programmes at the Blackwood Gallery, all of which were compound presentations curated by Christof Migone: Fall In (2009) followed Fall Out (2009), The Projects: Port Credit (2009) followed The Projects: Port Credit (2010), WOOD TWO (2012) followed WOOD (2011). Always Already refers to each of these iterative exhibitions, while collapsing the history of the gallery, its curatorial experiments and creative leadership, with future stratospheres of rolling rehearsals, arrangements, and formats. Surfacing between multiple points of manifestation, this exhibition is the articulation of just one moment, one example. Here, the artworks crystallize in a [somewhat] material form.

For more information, click here.



ARTBus Tour
Sunday, June 21, 12 – 5pm
The tour starts at the Ryerson Image Centre (33 Gould St, Toronto) 12noon and then departs for Blackwood Gallery and Oakville Galleries. A $10 donation includes afternoon refreshments by the Trafalgar Brewing Company and Whole Foods Market, Oakville. Seating is limited. To RSVP contact artbus@oakvillegalleries.com or call 905-844-4402 ext. 24 by Friday, June 19 at 4pm.



ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

Generously supported by the Canada Council for the Arts and the Ontario Arts Council.

The exhibition The Figure in the Carpet has benefited from the additional support of the Department of Anthropology (UTM) through the temporary loan of artefacts from the Deborah J. Berg Faunal Collection and FLOR Store – Toronto, 162 Cumberland Ave.

Funding for additional staff support made possible through the Young Canada Works in Heritage Organizations program, Department of Canadian Heritage. The Canadian Museums Association administers the museum component of the YCW program on behalf of the Department of Canadian Heritage.


Image credit:

Istanbul Archeology Museums, 2015. Courtesy of the artists.
Ryan Park, untitled (4’33”), 2006. Courtesy the artist and the Blackwood Gallery.



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Blackwood Gallery
University of Toronto Mississauga
3359 Mississauga Road
Mississauga, Ontario
L5L 1C6, Canada
905.828.3789
www.blackwoodgallery.ca
blackwood.gallery@utoronto.ca
Click here for bus, shuttle, and car direction.

Gallery Hours
Monday - Friday: 12 - 5pm
Wednesday: 12 - 9pm
Saturday - Sunday: 12 - 3pm

The gallery is closed on statutory holidays.
The gallery is wheelchair accessible. Admission is FREE.

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Group Exhibition: Playlist

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Published on : 2015-06-13 01:00:00


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Playlist, exhibition view, Roula Partheniou, Jon Rafman


Playlist

Michael Assiff
James Kerr
Sara Magenheimer
Roula Partheniou
Jon Rafman


Until​ ​July 18, 2015

galerie antoine ertaskiran is proud to present the second edition of Playlist, its summer group exhibition, showcasing five young Canadian and American artists: Michael Assiff, James Kerr, Sara Magenheimer, Roula Partheniou and Jon Rafman. Their works come together to create a unique visual, sensorial and interactive experience. The title, Playlist, brings out the diversity of aesthetics and mediums that will be found in this engaging show. The public is invited to discover the distinctive approach of these artists coming together as a whole for the first time.

Michael Assiff makes paintings, objects and installations that investigate cultural heritage, environmentalism and branding. Much of the work takes the form of the handmade, challenging the nature and authority of the manufactured objects they draw from. Imagery in the work is sourced from Internet newsfeeds as well as petroglyphs, creating a continuum of nature, culture, history and industry that the artist uses to stage contemporary commercial tableaux.

James Kerr, through animation and digital collage, wants to convey his vision of the world around him by repurposing elements from the art canon in such a manner as to give the works a new life outside of the canvas on which they originally appear. With his work, Kerr explores the often mundane and, at times, bizarre parts of modern life.

Sara Magenheimer works across a variety of media, including video, sculpture and photography. Magenheimer’s language-based practice treats objects, images and the human voice as raw material, personal signifiers and semantic stand-ins. Through rhythm and syncopation of visual deviation, she creates experimental strategies for reading the world.

Roula Partheniou’s practice explores the replica and how the remaking of a familiar object can shift our perception and perspective. Her projects take the form of sculptural installations that make use of material puns, context, colour cues and various degrees of trompe l'oeil to deconstruct the familiar and trigger a reconsideration of common forms. Her work questions how we see and read objects and challenges the viewer to negotiate between the perceived and the actual.

Jon Rafman, explorer and archivist of Internet culture, investigates the changing nature of the self under contemporary conditions as he navigates the boundaries between the virtual and the real, the historical and the personal. His body of digital and physical works traverses the found and the made, the still and the moving, incorporating video, installation, sculpture, photography and painting. By exploring both the physical and the virtual, his works take up an unfamiliar and singular third space between the two realms.


galerie antoine ertaskiran
1892 rue Payette
Montreal, QC H3J 1P3 Canada
tel : +1 514.989.7886

www.galerieantoineertaskiran.com

facebook : https://www.facebook.com/galerieantoineertaskiran
twitter : https://twitter.com/galerieae
instagram : https://instagram.com/galerieantoineertaskiran


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Playlist, exhibition view, Sara Magenheimer, Michael Assiff, Roula Partheniou


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Playlist, exhibition view, Sara Magenheimer, James Kerr

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Sarah Burwash and Gillian Dykeman: Reunion in Feral Forest

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Published on : 2015-06-13 01:00:00


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Gillian Dykeman, Fire a Rifle, 2014, video still. Courtesy of the Artist.

DNA artspace is pleased to present:

Reunion in Feral Forest
Sarah Burwash and Gillian Dykeman
June 13 – July 25, 2015

Opening Reception: June 13, 7 – 11pm. Performance by Gillian Dykeman at 9pm

The stereotypical Canadian woodsman is met by the strong and imaginative presence of an assertive feminism in Reunion in Feral Forest. This joint exhibition between Gillian Dykeman and Sarah Burwash poses a sincere-yet-tongue-in-cheek confrontation to our ideologically formed wilderness landscape.

Dykeman aims to reveal the patriarchal and nationalistic mythology of the Canadian wilderness. By performing the gendered archetype role of a woodsman, she employs pathos and parody to undermine this character’s various endeavours at self-realization. As the woodsman, Dykeman attempts yet fails to wrestle a bear, chop down a tree with an axe, and fire a rifle. These acts compromise the premise of the woodsman’s existence in popular culture. The tension that is created between what is real and what is not is further explored with purported plein-air paintings and a floppy paper mache canoe.

Burwash is curious about landscape as a tool to navigate the psychological realm and literal representations of nature; rocks, foliage, and wild animals allude to ethereal and inner worlds of the psyche. Burwash's landscapes re-imagine the natural world as a fictional backdrop for radical social experiments as she returns again and again to painting human figures with agency. These figures do not conform to gendered behaviour, but rather confront representations of the female subject, brave physical feats, and explore new locales of emotional vulnerability.

The Artists would like to gratefully acknowledge the support of the Ontario Art Council and Arts Nova Scotia for funding this project.


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Sarah Burwash, Better With Me (detail), 2015, watercolour and collage on paper, 75 x 76 cm. Courtesy of the Artist
and Penelope Smart.


http://www.gilliandykeman.com/
http://sarahburwash.com/
Reunion in Feral Forest Facebook Event


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123 Dundas Street
London, Ontario, Canada
N6A 1E8

VISIT Tuesday to Friday 11 - 5 | Saturday 12 - 5 | Sunday + Monday Closed
CONTACT info@dnaartspace.com | 519.435.1234 | www.dnaartspace.com

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Duke and Battersby: Curiosity Built the Cat

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Published on : 2015-06-12 01:00:00


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Duke and Battersby
Curiosity Built the Cat

Curated by Evan Tyler

June 12 - July 25, 2015
Opening reception: Friday, June 26 starting at 7PM


Cooper Battersby and Emily Vey Duke are partners in life, art and curious inquisitions into the human condition. Since the mid-1990's, the duo known as Duke and Battersby have produced an impressive number of works in a diversity of media that include video, sculpture, installation, printed matter and the written word.

The show Curiosity Built the Cat provides the audience with a survey of some of their most profound works from 1997 to the present, and also features the Canadian premiere of their latest video "Dear Lorde". This exhibition expresses the essence of a true lifelong collaboration: the unique, poetic pursuit of curiosity and empathy.

A book titled Curiosity Built the Cat is available in a limit run of one hundred copies. This publication features original stills from the artist's videos, as well as original text and drawings by the curator that illustrate certain ideas and experiences generated by the art of Duke and Battersby.

For more information on the book please email Evan Tyler: art@evantyler.ca

dukeandbattersby.com
evantyler.ca
whitewatergallery.com


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White Water Gallery
122 Main St. E
North Bay, ON P1B 8K6
705-476-2444

info@whitewatergallery.com

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